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Jan 13 19

Katie Ledecky cruises to win No. 4 at TYR Pro Swim Series at Knoxville

by ZwemZa

Katie Ledecky (USA Swimming)

Five-time Olympic champion and world record-holder Katie Ledecky (Bethesda, Md./Nation’s Capital Swim Club/Alto Swim Club) cruised to a victory of more than 27 seconds in the women’s 1500-meter freestyle Saturday for her fourth win at the TYR Pro Swim Series at Knoxville.

Full Results

Ledecky, who also won the 200m and 400m free and 400m individual medley this week at the University of Tennessee’s Allan Jones Intercollegiate Aquatic Center, led wire-to-wire in the 1500m free to touch in 15 minutes, 45.59 seconds. She has held the world record in the event, which will be contested at the Olympic Games for the first time in 2020, since 2013.

“It’s good to race in January. We’re in heavy training right now, so I didn’t really have any expectations I just wanted to get in and race and just get 2019 started,” Ledecky said. “I go back to Stanford tomorrow and have a good block of training.”

Olympic champions Ryan Murphy (Jacksonville, Fla./California Aquatics) and Simone Manuel (Sugar Land, Texas/Alto Swim Club/First Colony Swim Team) also were victorious for the second straight night. Murphy won the men’s 200m backstroke by 2 seconds in 1:56.16, while Manuel won the women’s 100m free in 53.42. National Team member Regan Smith (Lakeville, Minn./Riptide Swim Team) also earned win No. 2, taking the women’s 200m back title in 2:07.53.

World champion Chase Kalisz (Bel Air, Md./Athens Bulldog Swim Club) claimed the men’s 200m IM easily in 1:57.68, while fellow Olympic medalist Melanie Margalis (Clearwater, Fla./St. Petersburg Aquatics) won the women’s 200m IM in 2:10.43. Michael Chadwick (Charlotte, N.C./Team Elite) closed out the meet with a victory in the men’s 100m free in 49.17.

Knoxville favorite Molly Hannis (Santa Rosa, Calif./Tennessee Aquatics) won the women’s 50m breast in 30.69, while Nic Fink (Morristown, N.J./Athens Bulldog Swim Club) took the men’s 50m breast in a TYR Pro Swim Series record 27.34.

Denmark’s Anton Ipsen claimed the men’s 1500m free title for his third win in Knoxville in 15:16.19.

After four stellar days of competition in Knoxville, the 2019 TYR Pro Swim Series resumes March 6-9 in Des Moines, Iowa.

Across the 2019 TYR Pro Swim Series, swimmers may earn increased awards for top-three finishes. At each meet, $1,500 will be provided for a first-place finish, $1,000 for second and $500 for third. In addition, one athlete per gender with the highest-scoring prelim swim in an individual Olympic event based on FINA power points will win $1,500.

The TYR Pro Swim Series was brought to Knoxville in partnership with the Visit Knoxville Sports Commission and Tennessee Aquatics.

 

 

Jan 12 19

Ledecky, Manuel and Murphy all victorious at TYR Pro Swim Series at Knoxville

by ZwemZa

Simone Manuel (Twitter)

Five-time gold medalist Katie Ledecky (Bethesda, Md./Nation’s Capital Swim Club/Alto Swim Club) picked up her third win of the meet, and fellow Olympic champions Simone Manuel (Sugar Land, Texas/Alto Swim Club/First Colony Swim Team) and Ryan Murphy (Jacksonville, Fla./California Aquatics) also earned victories Friday at the TYR Pro Swim Series at Knoxville.

Results

Ledecky won the women’s 400-meter freestyle in 4 minutes, 2.71 seconds for a 7-second victory at the University of Tennessee’s Allan Jones Intercollegiate Aquatic Center. She won the women’s 200m free and 400m individual medley on Thursday.

Manuel took the women’s 50m free in 24.75 by just three-hundredths over runner-up Margo Geer (Milford Center, Ohio/Mission Viejo Nadadores), who was second in 24.78, while Murphy took the men’s 100m back by over a second in 53.17.

“That was a nice start to the year,” Murphy said. “I think in terms of execution it was probably a little bit sloppy, but that’s pretty typical for right now. We’re working hard, trying to have good effort in the races and the time was good tonight. As we clean it up, I’m pretty excited about where it can go.”

Olympic silver medalist Josh Prenot (Santa Maria, Calif./California Aquatics) picked up his second win of the meet in men’s 200m breaststroke, touching in 2:09.96 after winning the 400m IM on Thursday. Annie Lazor (Beverly Hills, Mich./Mission Viejo Nadadores) also won for the second night in a row, taking the women’s 200m breast in 2:23.51 after earning the 100m breast title on Thursday.

Olympian Hali Flickinger (Spring Grove, Pa./Athens Bulldog Swim Club) won her signature event, the women’s 200m butterfly, in 2:07.21.

Other USA Swimming National Team members earning victories Friday included Gianluca Urlando (Sacramento, Calif./DART Swimming) in the men’s 200m fly in 1:57.04, Michael Andrew (Lawrence, Kan./Race Pace Club) in the men’s 50m free in 22.11 and Regan Smith (Lakeville, Minn./Riptide Swim Team) in the women’s 100m back in 59.37.

The evening closed with the 200m mixed medley relay won by the DiRado Squad – Phoebe Bacon, Nic Fink, Urlando and Manuel – in a time of 1:43.48.

Canada’s Penny Oleksiak won the women’s 50m fly in 26.00, Guatemala’s Luis Martinez took the men’s 50m fly in 23.60 and Denmark’s Anton Ipsen won the men’s 400m free in 3:52.26 for his second victory of the weekend.

Across the 2019 TYR Pro Swim Series, swimmers may earn increased awards for top-three finishes. At each meet, $1,500 will be provided for a first-place finish, $1,000 for second and $500 for third. In addition, one athlete per gender with the highest-scoring prelim swim in an individual Olympic event based on FINA power points will win $1,500.

The TYR Pro Swim Series is being brought to Knoxville in partnership with the Visit Knoxville Sports Commission and Tennessee Aquatics.

 

Jan 11 19

Fuel My Friday: Peanut butter and banana overnight oats

by ZwemZa

Overnight oats! So easy and so delicious – prep them the night before and you’ve got a breakfast-to-go that’s healthy and satisfying!

You can choose what you put in them, but this has to be one of my favourite combinations right now – creamy banana and vanilla with chia seeds and a nice dollop of crunchy peanut butter! It’s a heavenly breakfast in a cute jar (and it’s environmentally friendly – bonus!), so if you’d like to try it yourself check out the easy recipe below!

Remember you can adjust it to meet your own dietary needs and taste preferences.

In a medium jar mix together 50g jumbo oats, 1tbsp chia seeds (optional), 1tbsp vanilla protein powder (optional) or 1tsp vanilla extract + 1tsp honey, 130ml milk (I love using almond milk in mine), and 1/2 chopped banana.
Leave overnight for the oats and seeds to absorb the milk.
Top with 1tsp peanut butter and a couple of extra banana slices to finish before you tuck in!

(P.S. it doesn’t just have to be for breakfast! Enjoy these overnight oats at any time of the day when you need a nutritious sweet treat!)

Jan 11 19

Winter training of China’s national swimming team underway in SW China

by ZwemZa

Ye Shiwen (Getty Images)

A group of athletes from China’s national swimming team are engaging in winter training in Kunming, capital of southwest China’s Yunnan Province, preparing for the 2019 World Championship and Tokyo Olympics.

China’s swimming stars and champions of the world including Sun Yang, Xu Jiayu and Ye Shiwen have been taking systematic training sessions in Kunming for more than three weeks.

Located in the middle of the Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau, Kunming is at an altitude of more than 1,500 meters above sea level.

“Training at highland can help athletes be better prepared physically,” said Zhu Zhigen, coach of Sun Yang.

“2019 is vital for the preparation of Tokyo Olympics and we should also seize the opportunity in South Korea, as top swimmers will be there for world championship this year,” Zhu added.

Besides Kunming and Beijing, Australia and the United States have also been selected as training bases this time, according to the national swimming team.

Xinhua

Jan 11 19

Ledecky wins twice at TYR Pro Swim Series at Knoxville

by ZwemZa

Katie Ledecky (USA Swimming)

Five-time Olympic champion Katie Ledecky (Bethesda, Md./Nation’s Capital Swim Club/Alto Swim Club) doubled up with wins in the women’s 200-meter freestyle and 400m individual medley Thursday on night two of the TYR Pro Swim Series at Knoxville at the University of Tennessee’s Allan Jones Intercollegiate Aquatic Center.

Results

Ledecky won the night’s first event, taking the women’s 200m free title in 1 minute, 55.78 seconds ahead of teammate and fellow Olympic champion Simone Manuel (Sugar Land, Texas/Alto Swim Club/First Colony), who touched second in 1:58.52.

Ledecky, the defending women’s TYR Pro Swim Series champion, followed just over an hour later with the 400m IM victory in 4:39.39 after overtaking fellow Olympian Hali Flickinger (Spring Grove, Pa./Athens Bulldog Swim Club) with 35 meters to go. Flickinger finished in 4:39.80 for second.

“I was happy with them,” said Ledecky about her swims. “It was fun to do a double. This morning didn’t feel great, but I felt a lot better tonight and just wanted to get some good racing in.”

Three other U.S. Olympians were victorious on Thursday: Olivia Smoliga (Glenview, Ill./Athens Bulldog Swim Club) in the women’s 50m backstroke 27.85, Kelsi Dahlia (Westampton, N.J./Cardinal Aquatics) in the women’s 100m butterfly in 57.86 and Josh Prenot (Santa Maria, Calif./California Aquatics) in the men’s 400m IM in 4:18.74.

Other USA Swimming National Team members taking wins included Annie Lazor (Beverly Hills, Mich./Mission Viejo Nadadores) in the women’s 100m breaststroke in 1:06.89, Andrew Wilson (Bethesda, Md./Athens Bulldog Swim Club) in the men’s 100m breast in 1:00.57 and Michael Andrew (Lawrence, Kan./Race Pace Club) in the men’s 50m back in 24.73.

Brazil’s Joao De Lucca won the men’s 200m free in 1:49.48, while Germany’s Marius Kusch took the men’s 100m fly in 52.06.

Across the 2019 TYR Pro Swim Series, swimmers may earn increased awards for top-three finishes. At each meet, $1,500 will be provided for a first-place finish, $1,000 for second and $500 for third. In addition, one athlete per gender with the highest-scoring prelim swim in an individual Olympic event based on FINA power points will win $1,500.

The TYR Pro Swim Series is being brought to Knoxville in partnership with the Visit Knoxville Sports Commission and Tennessee Aquatics.

USA Swimming

 

Jan 11 19

Vegetables for Performance?

by ZwemZa

What if eating your vegetables could help your performance?  Were mom and dad right all along?

Last fall at the annual meeting of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, I attended a session from the leading expert on dietary nitrate for health and performance, Dr. Andrew Jones of the University of Exeter in the U.K.

His twitter handle is @AndyBeetroot, and beets – specifically beetroot juice – is a vegetable that contains a high concentration of dietary nitrate. The nitrate found in these veggies gets converted in the body to nitric oxide, which controls a lot of functions related to exercise performance, such as regulating blood vessel tone and blood flow.

Dr. Jones got interested in research on nitrate and beetroot from a 2007 study that showed using beetroot juice for three days improved exercise economy or efficiency by 3 to 5%. Put another way, beetroot juice reduced the oxygen cost of exercise.

The amount of dietary nitrate found in veggies varies depending on the soil they were grown in, but in addition to beets, try including these veggies in your diet to get more nitrate:

  • Root vegetables, including beets
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Lettuce
  • Spinach
  • Bok Choy
  • Chinese cabbage (also called Napa)
  • Rhubarb
  • And, my personal favorite, Arugula (also called Rocket)

Dietary nitrate can also help lower blood pressure, so including these veggies is good for the whole family. Nitrate may also enhance blood flow to the brain, improving cognitive function and can help with your body’s adaptation to training.

Dr. Jones uses beetroot juice in his research because he says it is easier to get a consistent dose and many athletes don’t like the “earthy” taste of beets.

I suggest including a wide variety of veggies because they offer more than just nitrate. They are also packed with fiber, vitamins and minerals. Try roasting carrots, beets, turnips, and other root veggies, add bok choy and napa to a stir-fry, and top your sandwiches, wraps, and pizza (yes, it is good!) with arugula, and snack on celery and carrot sticks. Not only will you increase nitrate intake, but you will sneak in some much-needed veggies.

 

Chris Rosenbloom, PhD, is a registered dietitian nutritionist who has provided nutrition information to coaches and athletes for over 30 years. She welcomes questions from swimmers, parents, and coaches at chrisrosenbloom@gmail.com.

Jan 10 19

Ashley Twichell, Anton Ipsen open TYR Pro Swim Series at Knoxville with wins

by ZwemZa

Ashley Twichell (Syracuse.com)

USA Swimming National Team member Ashley Twichell (Fayetteville, N.Y./TAC Titans) and Demark’s Anton Ipsen took home the 800-meter freestyle titles Wednesday in the opening session of the TYR Pro Swim Series at Knoxville at the University of Tennessee’s Allan Jones Intercollegiate Aquatic Center.

Twichell earned the women’s 800m free title in 8 minutes, 32.27 seconds ahead of fellow National Team members Erica Sullivan (Las Vegas, Nev./Sandpipers of Nevada) and Mariah Denigan (Walton, Ky./Northern KY Clippers), who touched in 8:37.39 and 8:38.14, respectively.

“I’m pretty happy with it,” Twichell said about her victory. “I’m not really rested or anything for this meet, just kind of checking in. I’m really focused on Open Water Nationals for the next few months, so I did 26 or 27,000 meters in the past Monday and Tuesday.”

Ipsen took the men’s win in 8:00:34, 9 seconds clear of Taylor Abbott (Cedar Park, Texas/Tennessee Aquatics), who placed second in 8:09.54. Canada’s Jeremy Bagshaw was third in 8:12.81.

Across the 2019 TYR Pro Swim Series, swimmers may earn increased awards for top-three finishes. At each meet, $1,500 will be provided for a first-place finish, $1,000 for second and $500 for third. In addition, one athlete per gender with the highest-scoring prelim swim in an individual Olympic event based on FINA power points will win $1,500.

The TYR Pro Swim Series is being brought to Knoxville in partnership with the Visit Knoxville Sports Commission and Tennessee Aquatics.

USA Swimming

Jan 9 19

Runge brings experience to new home

by ZwemZa

Cierra Runge (Sun Devils)

After attending swimming powerhouse Cal out of high school in 2014-15 — and breaking three school records in her freshman season — Cierra Runge redshirted her sophomore season to train in Tempe for the 2016 Rio Olympic Games.

Runge still had a steep hill to climb to be able to compete as a member of Team USA in Rio. In June 2016, after a six-week training camp at the Colorado Springs Olympic Training Center, Runge participated in the Olympic Trials for a chance to represent her country the following month in Brazil. After coming up just short of the top two in the individual 400-meter freestyle, Runge knew she needed to give everything she had to be able place either first or second in the 200-meter freestyle and earn a spot on the Olympic swimming roster.

“I touched the wall and I made the relay spot and I literally was like, ‘Do I laugh? Do I cry? Do I throw up?’ ” Runge said. “I was just so ecstatic.”

A month later, Runge was on her way to Rio with a team full of superstar swimmers such as Allison Schmitt, Missy Franklin and Michael Phelps. For her, it was a moment she had been working towards her entire life and there was never a time she felt out of place.

“I trained with Michael and Allison and those guys for five years previously so it was kind of like coming home to family,” Runge said. “Obviously I was still freaking out because it was the Olympic Games and this was the first time I was doing this big meet I had been striving for for 18 years, but it was a lot of fun.”

After winning gold in the 4×200-meter freestyle relay, the plan was for Runge to return to Cal to finish up her collegiate swimming career. Things changed quickly, and the Olympian found herself breaking records as a Wisconsin Badger swimmer that next year before deciding she needed a new environment.

Even with an Olympic gold medal and 18 years of competitive swimming on her resume, Cierra Runge was looking for a fresh start.

She found it in Tempe.

“I decided on ASU because I think the coaching staff, the team, what we’re building here is pretty incredible and elite,” said Runge, now a part of her third Division I swimming program. “We’re really striving to push some barriers and do some great things so I was really attracted to that.”

While preparing for the Olympic Games, the former fifth-ranked swim recruit in the nation practiced under legendary swim coach Bob Bowman. Runge had known the current Sun Devils coach from her days making the three-hour round trip to Baltimore from her home in Pennsylvania as a teenager.
“She asked if she could come here and I’m glad she did,” Bowman said. “She’s had a couple of really tough years after Rio. Now, she’s worked through all of those things and is in a really good place. Now, I think she’s in a place where she can start getting back on the progress.”

When Bowman first met Runge in 2011, there was one factor to her swimming that stood out above the rest.

“Her height,” he said. “She has a really great swimming physique.”

At 6-feet-4 inches tall, Runge’s size gives her an advantage both inside and outside of the pool. While Runge is humble about her success, when she steps on deck at a swim meet, her reputation follows her.

“I had been at meets with her but I never actually talked to her because it’s kind of intimidating,” said teammate Erica Laning.

Laning and her teammates found out through a SwimSwam.com article that Runge would be transferring to ASU late last year. After the news broke, there were mixed feelings about the impending arrival of the Olympian.

“We were all really excited,” Laning said. “Like this is going to be awesome and then it’s also somewhat intimidating because she’s an Olympic gold medalist. She’s been everywhere in swimming that we all want to go.”

Having an Olympic gold medalist on your swim team is not an advantage a lot of universities have the chance of experiencing. With Runge’s arrival, the Sun Devils swim team instantly improved and gained a leader who knows what it takes to reach the pinnacle of the sport.

“When she first got here, it was crazy to think somebody that had won a gold medal was going to be on our team,” Laning said. “Just to be in the realm of competing with her in practices is really beneficial.”

Bowman added, “It just gives confidence when you have somebody on your team who can swim on an Olympic level. Number one, you can see what it takes to swim on that level. And you see somebody doing it, it makes it easier for you to replicate. At least you can establish the forest even if you can’t hit all of the trees. She gives them confidence that people who have trained here can do it.”

Runge cannot compete until January when the Sun Devils begin the transition into the championship season, but she is already looking forward to the challenge.

“I like pushing myself to see what I can do on a day-to-day basis, on a meet basis, and how I can best represent ASU, Team USA, myself, my family, and just have fun,” Runge said. “It’s one of those sports where you can’t really fake it. You’ve got to be all-in or else it’s just not worth it. Every day might not be fun but you’ve got to be all-in and you’ve got to do it. Because for me, competing is fun and doing really well is fun.”

In less than two years, Runge will turn her focus to Tokyo in pursuit of a few more medals to add to her trophy case. After only competing on a relay team in Rio, Runge is looking to add a few individual races to the schedule in her next Olympics. If one thing is for certain, it is that Runge will be training relentlessly during her time at ASU to make her next trip to the Olympics even more productive than the last.

“I’m excited for the future,” Runge said. “It’s going to be good.”

 Shawn Moran, Sun Devil Athletics Feature Writer

Jan 9 19

Olympian Michael Phelps honored for mental health advocacy

by ZwemZa

Michael Phelps (AP Photo)

Michael Phelps is picking up more hardware — this time for what he’s been doing outside the pool.

The Boston-based Ruderman Family Foundation, a leading voice in calling for more opportunities for the disabled, said Tuesday the Olympic champion is the recipient of its fifth annual Morton E. Ruderman Award in Inclusion.

The foundation told The Associated Press it picked the world’s most decorated swimmer of all time to recognize his advocacy for people with disabilities and “his own journey with mental health.”

Phelps has gone public about his struggles with depression and thoughts of suicide.

Last year, the 23-time Olympic gold medalist announced a partnership with Talkspace , which provides online therapy for those who are going through tough times. Phelps said helping people overcome the dark chapters in their lives is “way bigger than ever winning gold medals.”

In a statement, the 33-year-old Olympian thanked the Ruderman Family Foundation for “their continued efforts to help eliminate the shame and stigma that surrounds mental illness.”

“Together, we can normalize the mental health conversation and recognize the potential in every person — with or without mental illness — to contribute to our world in their own unique way,” Phelps said.

The foundation works for more inclusion and opportunities for the disabled. Previous recipients of its award include Oscar-winning actress Marlee Matlin and former Democratic U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin, of Iowa, a driving force behind the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Jay Ruderman, the foundation’s president, called Phelps an example of the importance of self-care and of reaching out for help when it’s needed. That helps take the stigma and shame away from mental health struggles, he said.

Phelps “has changed the landscape of mental health awareness,” Ruderman said.

Since retiring from competition after the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio, the swimmer has been promoting the importance of not just physical fitness but mental health. In 2017, he was honorary chairman of the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s National Mental Health Awareness Day.

He’s also served as an ambassador for the Child Mind Institute, a nonprofit group working to help children who struggle with mental health and learning disorders.

Jan 9 19

Swimmer’s Ear: What you should know

by ZwemZa

Swimmer’s ear is an infection of the outer ear canal usually caused by different types of bacteria commonly found in water. The water gets trapped in the ear, and the moisture softens the ear’s protective wax and allows the bacteria to grow, eventually infecting the ear canal.

Despite its name, you don’t have to be a swimmer or even go in the water to get swimmer’s ear. In fact, you can develop it when your ear is exposed to other types of moisture, including sweat or even being out in the rain or humid weather for long periods of time. You can also develop it by damaging the skin that lines the ear by putting foreign objects into your ear, like cotton swabs, your finger, or even ear buds.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms are usually mild at first but may get worse if your infection isn’t treated promptly. The infection can spread beyond the ear canal and lead to a chronic infection. On rare occasions, the infection can reach the soft tissue and bone, which can require emergency treatment.

Remember, swimmer’s ear is most often caused by bacterial infection and may require treatment with a prescription medicine from a doctor. Contact your doctor if you’re experiencing any signs or symptoms of swimmer’s ear, even if they’re mild.

Here are some symptoms to look for:

  • Itching
  • Redness
  • Discomfort made worse by pulling on your outer ear
  • Drainage of clear, odorless fluid
  • Feeling of fullness inside your ear
  • Partial blockage of your ear canal by swelling
  • Decreased or muffled hearing or temporary hearing loss

How can you lower your risk for getting swimmer’s ear?

Keep in mind that swimmer’s ear is associated with excess moisture in your ear. So first and foremost, try to keep from overexposing your ears to water.

  • Dry your ears thoroughly after swimming or showering—use a towel, tilt your head to hold each ear facing the ground to allow water to escape, or pull your earlobe indifferent directions while each ear is facing the ground
  • Use a bathing cap or ear plugs when swimming
  • Don’t swim in water with elevated bacteria levels, such as a lake. Try to stick to well-maintained pools with proper pH levels and those that are properly disinfected
  • Keep foreign objects out of your ear to avoid breaking the skin
  • Don’t remove ear wax. If you think your ear canal is blocked by ear wax, talk to your doctor

It’s worth repeating that swimmer’s ear is an infection that may require a doctor’s attention. If you think you may have swimmer’s ear, or are experiencing any symptoms, talk to your doctor. And if you are diagnosed with it, know that you’re not alone and there are treatments for it.

USA Swimming

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